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Where to Visit in Tasmania? Here's Ten Great Places.

by Scrubba Guru |

Lockdown restrictions and social distancing have become the new norm of today and has us dreaming about all the places we cannot go to. At the moment, COVID19 cases are declining and within the next couple of months  we may see interstate domestic travel reopen state borders. With no overseas travel in mind till at least another 12 months, Tasmania is a state that should be added to your domestic travel bucket list.

The smallest state out of the six states, Tasmania is 240 km off mainland Australia. Our largest island has simply so much to explore with shorter driving distance between towns and there is a large chunk of places that have remained untouched. Tassie is the state for those looking to explore the natural beauty of Australia with 40% of the land mass being made up of national parks and nature reserves, including some world heritage listed sites. This state also has small and vibrant cities, plenty of hiking trails, famous beaches, lakes and even snow capped mountains that remind us of a mini New Zealand. While we are all teaming up to do our part to flatten the curve, we’ve put together a list of 10 beautiful spots to visit in Tasmania when it is of course safe to do so.

  1. Launceston

Launceston is known as the second biggest city in the heart of Northern Tasmania that offers an abundance of culture including culinary food and wine, museums and boutiques. A fifteen minute walk from the city centre will take you towards the South Esk river that runs along the natural beauty of the Cataract Gorge. To find the best view of the Gorge, we suggest walking across the main bridge or taking a ride on the world's longest single span chairlift. Launceston is also reasonably close to a few  countryside areas and is a great place to drive around and spend the day at places like Bridestowe Lavender farm. This lavender farm is the biggest lavender farm in the southern hemisphere which is best to see at full peak between the hotter seasons of December and January. Take a stroll through the many rows of violet fields to capture the most aesthetically pleasing insta shot or check out the gift shop to pick up pretty much anything lavender scented from ice-cream, skincare and honey. It seems like a dream place for lavender lovers! 

 

 

  2. Tamar Valley

The Tamar Valley is one of the many wine growing regions in Tasmania that produces cool climate wines, cheeses and other dairy products on the market. The valley is located on both sides of the Tamar River that flows from Launceston to Bass Strait. If you're interested in arts or writing, we highly suggest booking a trip in September to see the Tamar Writers festival, it is a biennale festival that occurs over three days. The most convenient way to see any of the thirty wineries is by car so you can get across each side of the river. One cellar door that is on our list is Clover Hills Winery, they specialise in sparkling wines such as pinot grigio and sauvignon blanc. Enjoy some wine tastings with artisan cheeses, relaxing outdoors on a bean bag cushion. Now that sounds like a place to visit once the restrictions ease!

Take a sip and admire the views. Pic via @tamarvalleytasmania

 

 

 3. Bay of Fires

Another natural beauty not to miss is Bay of Fires, a scenic coastline stretched across 30km from Binalong bay to Eddystone Point. This bay is home to some pretty unique natural granite formations that consist of orange and reddish tones caused by a natural reaction from lichens. These rocks can be seen anyway along the bay with their forms varying and some even have moss growing over them. A common misconception is that the name originated from the famous rocks but instead it was named after an explorer who discovered the area due to the Indigenous Australians lighting fires on the sand. Bay of Fires has more than just beaches. Make sure you  check out the many walks, waterfalls, oyster farms and even see a lagoon.  

  Gaze at the sunset.  Pic via@bayoffirestasmania

 

 

 

4. Strahan

Strahan is a small harbour town situated along the rugged west coast of Tasmania. It is a little less accessible than the other areas on our list as it does take around four to five hours to get to from the city of Hobart but it shouldn’t be overlooked on your road trip. Strahan is the only town located along the enormous Macquarie Harbour with Hogarth falls only a short distance from the town centre. The walking track is twenty minutes each way and has safe walking paths suitable for a family outing. A few standout activities include the steamship train, yacht charters, seeing the oldest pine mill in the world, sand dunes and chances to 4WD off road. Last but not least, you will need to dedicate a whole day going on a river cruise along the famous Gordan River. The all day cruise passes also passes along a convict island and UNESCO world heritage listed Franklin-Gorden national park.

Cruise along the famous Gordan River. Pic via @strahanvillage

 

 

 

 5. Freycinet National Park

Another spectacular Tasmanian destination is Freycinet National Park, which is located along the east coastline of the Island. It’s home to Wineglass bay, one of the top rated beaches in the world thanks to the clear blue coastline, white sandy beach and the pink granite mountains that surround this place. The small fee is worth it when you get to see this stunning park in its glory. The best way to see Wineglass bay is taking a scenic drive or alternatively choosing a few hikes to accomplish. We suggest going early to beat the crowds and see the magnificent sunrise. If staying in the national park is on your bucket list, you can only stay at Freycinet Park Lodge which offers chalets that overlooks Oyster Bay and the Hazards Mountain ranges. A popular place to stay outside of the park is a small town called Coles Bay that has a few shops and cafes to venture to.

Walk along the stunning coastline. Pic via @freycinetnp

 

 

 

 6. Hobart

A firm place on our list, the charming capital is home to many cultural and natural activities. Hobart is often known as one of the quieter capital cities although unlike other cities, it is surrounded by the breathtaking views of Mount Wellington. One of the best free activities to do in Mount Wellington is to capture photos of the bay, city waterfront and the hills. Make sure to pack a jacket and beanie as it is very windy and can get to 5℃ even when the CBD below is 25℃. Don’t fret if you forgot your jacket as there is an indoor observation deck. If you're lucky to be visiting on a Saturday you should check out the world renowned Salamanca Market along the stretch of historical buildings in the CBD. With over 300 stalls, it is a great place to mingle with the locals, pick up an authentic souvenir, support local farmers, artists and of course the delicious food stalls. If you're an art fanatic or have never been to a gallery, MONA in short for the Museum of Old and New Art is the largest public funded gallery in the Southern Hemisphere. Having only begun in 2011, this gallery has come up in conversation as not only one of the best Australian galleries but also the very best in the world. Mona is only twenty minutes away with car and scenic ferry options. Not only does the artwork push boundaries, the architecture of the building is also a wonder in itself. Underground with three levels of art in a cave sounds like an experience not to forget.  

See the city from above at Mount Wellington. Pic via @hobartandbeyond

 

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Things have really taken an unexpected turn this year. As the situation evolves, our usual routines and travel plans are also changing. In the meantime, we'll continue to share your beautiful photos of our beloved #HobartandBeyond. We all need something to look forward to, and we hope that our posts help you to take a break and dream about the special places you'll be able to explore in the future. Or maybe our posts will remind you of happy memories you’ve made on our beautiful little island. Take care and look out for each other. 💚 P.S. Let us know if there is anything in particular you’d like to see from Southern Tasmania and we’ll talk to the social fairies to see what we can do. 📷: kunanyi/Mt Wellington, channelling international space station vibes, by @deni_cupit. For all the dreamers. 🔭

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  1. Bruny Island

 A trip to Tasmania isn't complete till you take a ferry from Hobart to Bruny Island; an island  that is renowned for its wildlife, southern lights, seafood and handmade treats. For many travelers the Northern Lights in Norway are on top of many bucket lists, but little do people know that there are Southern lights. The Southern aurora lights can be seen throughout the winter months and Bruny Island is one of the prime locations to witness this.

One of your first stops needs to climb the many stairs to the insta famous “The Neck Lookout”. This lookout point has land connecting both the North and South of the Island with two beaches surrounding each side. From above, you may be lucky enough to spot penguins waddling along the beach or even spot a native albino wallabies. While on the island make sure to eat at a few local businesses such as Get Shucked Oysters (they even offer a drive thru service), Bruny Chocolate Factory, Bruny Cheese and Beer Company and the Bruny Berry Farm.

 See rare glowy blue waters along the coastline. Pic via @brunyislandau

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“The sea between them ran like molten metal, and the backwash was a mesmerizing weave of soft silver rivers running against themselves, occasionally throwing up a ghostly silver arm.” —Robert Finch ⠀'The Outer Beach' ⠀ 📸 @hartvigsenrod 📍 @BrunyIslandAU, TAS, 🇦🇺 ⠀ "Every day we should hear at least one ⠀ little song, read one good poem, ⠀ see one exquisite picture, and, if possible, ⠀ speak a few sensible words." ⠀ — Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832) 🌏 www.brunyisland.com.au 🐕 No Pet Policy (protects our native wildlife) ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ #BrunyIslandAU #BrunyIsland #australia #tassie #bioluminescence #seasparkle #fiftyshades_of_nature_ #bioluminescent #magicnature #awesomenature #incrediblenature #earth_shots #raw_allnature #fifty_shades_of_nature #ig_naturemagic #magicpict #seascape_captures #seascapephotography #seascape_lovers #seascapegram #earthvisuals

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 8. Cradle Mountain- St Clair National Park

For a wilderness escape with views that make you feel like your in New Zealand, surround yourself in one of Australia’s hidden gems. Cradle mountain is nestled in Tasmania and is 1000 metres above sea level. This area has snowy cold weather all year round even in the typically hot Australian summer. Due to the chilliness, we would recommend booking a lodge in the world heritage listed Cradle-Lake Clair National Park. The best way to venture out is by going on short walks such as the enchanted walk or the waterfalls walk, just outside your doorstep. The enchanted walk only takes about twenty minutes and is perfect for seeing wild animals and native flora such as wombats, wallabies, moss trees and glistening streams. No cars are allowed to travel around Cradle mountain with the exception of the daily shuttle buses. Due to the lack of cars, this area is very quiet and offers you a peaceful trip. A unique dining experience can be found at Devils cradle, which is a sanctuary for Tasmanian devils where you can learn more about these animals

 Visit the picturesque snow capped mountains. Pic via @cradlemountainhotel

 

 

 9. Port Arthur

The Port Arthur Historic Site is located along the Tasman Peninsula and will take you back to 19th century colonial history. Port Arthur is an open air museum that spans across forty hectares with plenty of space to roam around and explore the history of this convict penal settlement. It’s hard to think that such a picturesque and seemingly peaceful area would be home to thousands of the worst criminals. This heritage listed location has more than thirty buildings that include an old penitentiary, church, insane asylum and the hospital. The entry ticket you pay is quite generous including a forty minute walking guided tour, twenty-five minute harbour cruise to the Isle of the dead and access to all the exhibitions on offer. If you don’t mind getting spooked, you can take their lantern- lit haunted night ghost tour! Explore the early history of Australia. Pic via @portarthurtassie

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Tassie shone as bright as the Milky Way at the recent Australian Tourism Awards, with 17 medals all up including 7 gold! Our state (and, indeed, country) has faced many challenges, but with passionate people and businesses like those who were awarded, as well as all those contributing to the vibrant and caring Tasmanian tourism industry, we will continue to thrive. A huge thank you to the Port Arthur Historic Sites team and those who have supported us through 2019, especially the visitors who allow us to continue to share this important part of Australia’s history. Getting Port Arthur in its night time glory is @paulpayasalad Special mention to our fellow gold winners: @roaring40skayaking @ashdownsofdover @mariaislandwalk @ibisstyleshobart @awbfestival @macq01 #tict #qata19 #discovertasmania #hobartandbeyond #australianconvictsites #worldheritagesite #convicthistory #portarthur #tasmanpeninsula #tasmania #igers_tas #igers_tasmania #holidayherethisyear #comedownforair

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 10. Tasman Peninsula

After completing a visit to Port Arthur you should definitely explore the rest of the Tasman Peninsula.The easiest way to get around the peninsula is by car, allowing you to easily visit a few places in one day. You should check out a few lookout areas such as the Tasman Arch, Devils kitchen, Remarkable Caves and Waterfall Bay. These places are known for their interesting rock and cliff formations caused by sea erosion.The Peninsula has some adventurous walking tracks at Cape Hauy. This 8.8k walking trail starts at Tasman Bay National Park and ends at Fortescue Bay. If visiting both the Tasman Peninsula and Port Arthur, we suggest to stay in a camping spot located a part of the Coral Mines Historic reserve as it runs along the Saltwater River.

Hike along the Cape Hauy track to view this wonderful natural element. Pic via @tasmanpeninsula

 

We hope that our list gives you some food for thought! The easing of restrictions could present the perfect opportunity to pack up the car, camper or RV and hit road, ticking off as many spots as you like on the way. With social distancing and heightened hygiene being the new normal, having your accommodation and wheels all in one definitely has its appeal, and to make that journey a little easier, why not pack a Scrubba wash bag for self-sufficient laundry on-the-go! Browse the Scrubba wash bag range to pick up the ultimate gear for your next TAS adventure.

 

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Tags: Australia, campervan, camping, Domestic travel, National travel, Post Coronavirus, Post Covid19 travel, Road trip, RV, RVer, Scrubba, Tasmania, top tips, travel, travel laundry